SPAM® Upside Down Pie

More Spam………..

Festive! Fun to Make!

SPAM® Upside Down Pie
SPAM® Upside Down Pie

Another recipe that was first published in LIFE magazine in 1945.

 According to writer Marguerite Patten in ‘Spam – The Cookbook’, the name was suggested by Kenneth Daigneau, an actor and the brother of a Hormel vice president, who was given a $100 prize for creating the name. At one time and persisting to this day in certain books, the theory behind the nomenclature of Spam was that the name was a portmanteau of “Spiced Meat and Ham”.
 
According to the British documentary-reality show “1940s House”, when Spam was offered by the United States to those affected by World War II in the UK, Spam stood for Specially Processed American Meats. Yesterday’s Britain, a popular history published by Reader’s Digest in 1998, unpacks Spam as “Supply Pressed American Meat” and describes it as an imported “wartime food” of the 1940s.Many jocular backronyms have been devised, such as “Something Posing As Meat”, “Specially Processed Artificial Meat”, “Stuff, Pork and Ham”, “Spare Parts Animal Meat” and “Special Product of Austin Minnesota”.
And yet more SPAM, SPAM, SPAM SPAM and SPAM………..

Before the internet became commercialised and unsolicited commercial e-mail was sent the name spam was given to sending the same mail several times for no good reason. This was because of the Monty Python ‘spam,spam,spam’ sketch.

 

 

Share

Springtime in an English Village

Unseen for years due to the fragility of the materials, ‘Springtime in an English Village’ offers an extraordinary and unexpected snapshot of rural life in wartime. After a fairly predictable opening – farmers ploughing fields, cute baby animals gambolling – it finally gets down to business. The film is about that most ancient of English traditions: the selection and crowning of the Queen of the May. But what is so surprising is that 60 years ago the village of Stanion in Northamptonshire chose to honour a young black girl – apparently the daughter of an African merchant seaman who had been evacuated there during the War.

It’s hard to know quite how literally to take the proceedings. The film was made by the Colonial Film Unit for the purpose of screening throughout Britain’s African and Caribbean colonies – to demonstrate ‘typical’ life in the UK – at a time when the government needed to recruit the support of men and women from across the Empire. Later, in the immediate post-War period, such films not only acted to reinforce imperial solidarity, but formed part of a propaganda campaign to attract cheap labour to the UK. (Robin Baker, with thanks to Tom Rice for additional research)

Share

Tea Making Tips (1941)

Welcome to the world of a national obsession and a place where people say ‘orf’ instead of ‘off’. Tea connoisseurs will benefit from the six golden tips for making the perfect cuppa, as well as countless other handy hints (never store your tea next to cheese, for example). There’s an assessment of the pros and cons of various teapots and words of wisdom about the tea bush itself.

Slightly grotesque methods for producing tea en masse are demonstrated – it was wartime, after all – and tea had to be produced by the oceanful. As such, there are some top tips for cleaning that hard-to-reach tap in your tea urn. Remember: “a dirty tap means dirty tea”

Share

Two Cooks and a Cabbage

This intriguing title is essential viewing for cooks everywhere, especially in times of austerity. The two cooks, Sally and Jane, are called upon to assist their forthright, no-nonsense northern Grandmother (Mrs Ingleton) in cooking dinner. The girls are sent to find a large cabbage from the wartime garden and cut it in half: a whole cabbage would be frivolous; there is a war on!

Sally and Jane choose different cooking techniques but the message is simple: never boil green vegetables in vast quantities of water.

Share